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Tag Archives: Environment

President Obama returning to WH during Hurricane Sandy


Photo courtesy of AP

After cancelling his appearance at a morning campaign rally in Orlando, Fla., President Barack Obama walks toward the White House in a driving rain Monday. Obama returned to Washington to monitor preparations for early response to Hurricane Sandy on Monday.

Mitt Romney would have someone carrying an umbrella for him as would other Republicans.

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Posted by on October 30, 2012 in Current Events, Photography

 

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Fire in the Sky

This beautiful photograph is found all over the internet so I don’t know who to credit for this amazing piece of art. I fell in love with it as did many others, obviously.

 
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Posted by on October 6, 2012 in Art, Environment, Nature, Photography

 

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The Silence on Global Warming

Harrowing predictions of climate scientists are coming true, as glaciers melt, forests burn, heat waves proliferate and freakish weather strikes in unexpected places. But the propagandists of global-warming denial have succeeded in silencing most politicians and the mainstream press. Written by Robert Parry


File Photo credit: Brittney Misialek, former WGN-TV intern.

Something called a “derecho” – a fast-moving line of thunderstorms – strikes the Washington area knocking out power for days. Massive forest fires ravage Colorado. A record heat wave covers much of the country. The U.S. press treats these events as major stories, but two words are rarely mentioned: “global warming.”

What has become most striking about the growing evidence that climate change is a clear and present danger – indeed an emerging existential threat – is the simultaneous failure of the U.S. news media to deal seriously with the issue, another sign of how the Right can intimidate the mainstream into going silent.

Evan Vucci/AP In Pictures: Extreme weather 2012

We have seen this pattern before, as the Right sets the media agenda by bullying those who threaten its ideological interests. Before the Iraq War, anyone who dared raise questions about the Bush administration’s justifications could expect to be marginalized or worse. Just ask Phil Donahue, Scott Ritter and the Dixie Chicks.

During Ronald Reagan’s presidency, his hard-nosed propagandists dubbed this tactic “controversializing,” that is, anyone who got too much in the way could expect to be subjected to systematic smears and professional deconstruction. With so many right-wing voices willing to say almost anything, it wasn’t hard to intimidate people.

The smart career play was always to retreat when these forces were arrayed against you. Why risk your six- or seven-figure salary on some issue when there are so many other stories that you can work on without all the grief?


Shelf cloud from the developing derecho in Chicago on June 29, 2012. Image Credit: NWS Meteorologist Samuel Shea

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Simply Beautiful Moments from National Geographic



Silverback Gorilla, Africa Photograph by Ian Nichols, National Geographic

Some photographic moments are memorable because they are so unlikely. It is impossible to look at this wonderful image by Ian Nichols and not smile. The juxtaposition of the giant silverback gorilla holding a delicate leaf is a delightful surprise and a unique moment. —Annie Griffiths

Photo Tip: The phrase “wait for it” must have been coined by a photographer, because it is such an essential part of what we do. When photographing wildlife, capturing the perfect moment is just as important as it is with humans—and requires even more patience. Link here.

African Lion Mother and Cub, Tanzania – Photograph by Mitsuaki Iwago, Minden Pictures

Everything about this photographic moment is tender. The light, the gesture, the color are perfect. But there is also a small detail that completes the intimacy of this scene by photographer Mitsuaki Iwago. It is the small catch-light in the lion cub’s eye. Perfect. —Annie Griffiths

Photo Tip: Capturing the catch-light in a subject’s eye can take a photograph from lovely to sublime. Eyes are the windows to the soul, so when the eye reflects a beam of light, it draws viewers in and makes them feel a greater intimacy with the subject. Link here.

 
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Posted by on November 25, 2011 in Art, Environment, Nature, Photography, Travel

 

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Many moods

Photography by Gracie – © All rights reserved

Cape Hatteras, NC

 

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Cape Elizabeth Coast in Maine

Camera directed towards full sun in last image.

Photography by Gracie – © All rights reserved

 

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Portland Head Light in Maine


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Portland Head has long protected Portland and the adjacent area. Cape Elizabeth residents were deeply committed to American independence from British rule. In 1776, the new Town of Cape Elizabeth posted a guard of eight soldiers at Portland Head to warn citizens of coming British attacks.

In 1787, the General Court of Massachusetts (the Massachusetts legislature) provided $750 to begin construction of a lighthouse. In 1790, when the United States Government took over the responsibility of all lighthouses, Congress appropriated $1,500 for its completion. The original tower measured 72′ from base to lantern deck and was lit with 16 whale oil lamps. It was first lit on January 10, 1791.

Construction of the first Keeper’s Quarters began in 1790 as the result of a contract signed by Massachusetts Governor John Hancock. A one story dwelling built to replace the first keeper’s house was erected in 1816. It measured 34′ x 20′ with two rooms, a cellar and a porch in the rear.

By 1864 a 4th order Fresnel lens and a cast iron staircase were installed.

By 1865, the tower was raised 20′ and a 2nd order Fresnel lens was installed. A portion of this lens may now be seen at the Museum at Portland Head Light. Except for a period between1883 and1885, this lens was in the lighthouse until 1958.

Late on Christmas Eve in 1886, the three masted bark Annie C. Maguire struck the ledge at Portland Head. Keeper Joshua Strout, his son, wife, and volunteers rigged an ordinary ladder as a gangplank between the shore and the ledge the ship was heeled against. Captain O’Neil, the ship’s master, his wife, two mates, and the nine man crew clambered onto the ledge and then to safety . The cause of the wreck is puzzling since visibility was not a problem. Members of the crew reported they “plainly saw Portland Light before the disaster and are unable to account for same.”

The current Keepers’ Quarters building was constructed in 1891 as a two story duplex. Until 1989, it was home to the head and assistant lighthouse keepers and their families.

Portland Head Light was the responsibility of the United States Department of the Treasury from 1790 to 1852 when management was transferred to the US Lighthouse Board. The Board was reorganized into the Bureau of Lighthouses in 1910. In 1939, aids to navigation became the responsibility of the United States Coast Guard. On August 7th, 1989, Petty Officer Davis Simpson struck the US flag for the last time at the decommissioning ceremony recognizing the automation of the lighthouse. The property was leased in 1990 to the Town of Cape Elizabeth. Three years later, through the efforts of United States Senator George Mitchell, the property was deeded to the Town. The United States Coast Guard maintains the actual light and the fog signal, but the remainder of the property is managed by the Town of Cape Elizabeth.

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Photography by Gracie – © All rights reserved

 

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